Friday, October 09, 2009

President Obama Awarded 2009 Nobel Peace Prize

Interesting, yet surprising. Less than a year in office, amidst increased war efforts in Afghanistan, troop deployment in Pakistan and a dire economic health at home. I wonder whether the timing is appropriate ... what do you think? Sounds premature, if you ask me. Or perhaps this is just what the Obama Administration needed to help them push through the massive opposition they're confronted with atop Capitol Hill and deliver upon their campaign promises, starting with: (1) Revamping Health Care,
(2) Addressing the Energy crisis, and (3) Education issue to name a few pressing U.S. centric issues.

Though, what about Obama's foreign policy agenda? Have significant steps been taken thus far to reduce tensions across ethnic, religious, and economic boundaries?

Don't get me wrong, personally I supported President Obama, and continue to offer my support however it's disappointing to see a continuation of the DC status quo of "big talk" and "no action" on the Hill. The question is, how will the Administration leverage this to finally deliver?

Continue reading at Reuters ...

2 comments:

Abdul Rahman Rafiq said...

Many supporters and opponents, liberals and conservatives are in shock and feel it may have been premature to award President Obama the Nobel Peace Prize at this time.

However, personally, as both a critic and supporter I think the Nobel Peace Prize will provide the Obama Administration with a certain level of credibility enabling them to deliver upon their agenda. The expectation bar has been raised many folds over. It's crucial that the Administration deliver, as you only get one chance, it's now or never.

I also want to also mention that it's critical for individual's who supported the campaign to come forward now and voice their concerns as a supporters. You worked to get President Obama elected, it's your voice that can carry the most weight. Lets work together, express our concerns and back the man we worked to get elected, and to deliver the sustainable and believable "change" promised during the campaign.

One way to go about doing that is pledging support to 'Organizing for America' (OFA http://tinyurl.com/Org4America), a grassroots prioject, launched by the Democratic National Committee (DNC). OFA aims at mobilizing people across the country to support the Presidents legislative agenda on health care, climate, energy, education and other top priorities.

Having said that I'd like to extend an invite to you to join me on October 15 in San Francisco at a reception with President Obama. For information and to RSVP visit http://tinyurl.com/oct15reception .

(Cross-posting as a comment to http://facebook.com/arafiq)

Abdul Rahman Rafiq said...

Note from President Obama:

This morning, Michelle and I awoke to some surprising and humbling news. At 6 a.m., we received word that I'd been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2009.

To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who've been honored by this prize -- men and women who've inspired me and inspired the entire world through their courageous pursuit of peace.

But I also know that throughout history the Nobel Peace Prize has not just been used to honor specific achievement; it's also been used as a means to give momentum to a set of causes.

That is why I've said that I will accept this award as a call to action, a call for all nations and all peoples to confront the common challenges of the 21st century. These challenges won't all be met during my presidency, or even my lifetime. But I know these challenges can be met so long as it's recognized that they will not be met by one person or one nation alone.

This award -- and the call to action that comes with it -- does not belong simply to me or my administration; it belongs to all people around the world who have fought for justice and for peace. And most of all, it belongs to you, the men and women of America, who have dared to hope and have worked so hard to make our world a little better.

So today we humbly recommit to the important work that we've begun together. I'm grateful that you've stood with me thus far, and I'm honored to continue our vital work in the years to come.

Thank you,

President Barack Obama